Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Yung Pak Corridor hike (Photo-essay #2)


Continuing from last week's Yung Pak Corridor hiking photo-essay... and for those who're into numbers, this was an 11 kilometer hike -- and my 56th post moving to Hong Kong! (And to give you an idea of how far behind I am in my hiking photo-essays, last Sunday, I went on my 84th hike since moving to Hong Kong!!) :b

Deep in the heart of Sai Kung East Country Park
lie large green moss-covered rocks like this one

Nearby flow hill streams around and over which
much vegetation grows (and cast their shadows)

Eye-catching bright yellow wild flowers
whose name escapes me (Can anyone ID them?)

The authorities sure chose a paint color
that would make these railings stand out!

A viewing that would be much improved by the
removal of the wires as well as on a less misty day

A section of woodland that's particular creeper-strewn

Misty view of a section of Three Fathoms Cove
with an artificial shelter area (that when we were there,
someone was steering a radio-controlled boat around!)

The final photo I took on this generally pleasant hike --
despite the misty and humid weather conditions -- was
of a few
of the egrets that are attracted to the
mudflats
of Kei Ling Ha Hoi (AKA Three Fathoms Cove)

4 comments:

sbk said...

The big rock covered with green moss is very cool looking.

Regarding the blue railings: maybe bright blue paint was on sale that day.

YTSL said...

Hi sbk --

Yay! Comments on this post! (Funny, but my mother and another friend commented via e-mail and other ways about the egrets photo... but no one has done so on this blog.)

Teehee re your blue paint suggestion... maybe there's something to it since I usually railings painted green (or, if they wish to make a splash, bright yellow) in the Hong Kong countryside. :D

Ann said...

Looks like we both enjoy hiking. Is it quite safe to hike alone?

YTSL said...

Hi Ann --

I know people who do hike alone but I'd caution against doing so because certain paths can be on the slippery side or tripping-tree-root filled and cause one to fall and injure oneself. Also, there are sections of the Hong Kong countryside that are outside of mobile phone coverage range -- or where one's mobile phone coverage suddenly jumps over to China's!